The Time We Make in Passing
by Gary McLouth

The Time We Make in Passing

 

McLouth’s poetry, while sublimely personal, connects us to the most basic and essential of our shared histories, hopes and fears. The poems, confident, curious, humble or confiding, unmask his vulnerability and caring, which gifts us with feeling that someone or something is “whispering my name.”

This collection of works across decades of McLouth’s career showcase depths of insight, humanity, melancholy, and humor. [more]

McLouth — Do No Harm

Do No Harm by Gary McLouth

Do No Harm

Do No Harm creates an in-depth, thoughtful, and artistically arranged conversation between the voices of the father and son who serve as alternate narrators throughout the book. These nine stories compose a complex duet in which two voices mingle and separate, both delving into their shared pasts, both examining and reexamining their connections to other people, to the places that profoundly affect them, and – always — to the web of family that binds them.

Natural Causes and Other Stories
by Gary McLouth

Natural Causes

McLouth’s characters in Natural Causes turn vulnerable moments into acts of insight, love and the kind of heroism that passes for simple good work in a small town. These stories are linked by the intents and intuitions of people determined to do the right thing even as they are destined to endure the realities of circumstance. You could say they act out of strong faith in God and from deep commitments to family, community, and freedom, but don’t ask them to talk about it much.

 

Campbell — My Korean War Story

Korean War StoryMy Korean War Story: A Rage Within
By James Campbell

In December 1948, James Campbell, 15, joined the U.S. Army. On June 25, 1950, North Korea invaded South Korea. Campbell, stationed in Japan, was among the first U.S. soldiers to join the conflict. This book is a collection of stories about a young soldier’s experience in the war. His accounts run the gamut of emotions—anger, heartbreak, apprehension, comradery, even humor. Campbell lets you see and feel the horrors of war through the eyes of a boy becoming a man.

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10 Adventures and More in Lee and Collier Counties: Forida on Land and Water by Alice Oldford

Where can you enjoy an active outdoor experience in bustling Lee and Collier counties in Florida? Interested in learning some local history? How did the Monday Group, a bunch of ‘70s teenagers, influence development of Six Mile Cypress Slough Preserve and Manatee Park. Who were the utopian Koreshans? Try a family outing at Everglades Wonder Gardens, formerly a roadside attraction in the heart of Bonita Springs. Experience Florida scrub at Hickey’s Creek Mitigation Park. And there is water, water everywhere perfect for a leisurely paddle. Adventure right here in your own back yard.

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Batch — Star’s Journey

Star's JourneyStar’s Journey
by Lisa Batch

Star’s Journey is a positive story about a pony who is visually impaired but who overcomes his fears and gains many friends in the process. It teaches young children valuable lessons about being a friend, overcoming personal obstacles, and the importance of not giving up. Children will love the ability to participate by acting out movements and interacting with the reader.

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Hayton — Chasing Brenda

Chasing Brenda
by Pauline Hayton

Her sixtieth birthday, her self-centered husband, and the death of a friend have Brenda wondering what happened to her once adventurous spirit. Determined to get it back, she hotfoots it to a remote village in India. When family members give chase to persuade her to come home, life becomes hectic. Arriving in India, rebels promptly kidnap Brenda’s ditzy granddaughters. With the police no help and her dander up, Brenda turns into “Wonder Woman” on a mission, embarking on a hare-brained scheme to rescue “her girls.” Her showdown with the maniacal rebel leader has Brenda fearing for her life and the lives of her granddaughters. Calling him a moron doesn’t help. Against all odds, she outwits the rebels. Using implements hidden in her bra, Brenda escapes with the girls under cover of night. Traipsing through jungle, dodging rebels and bullets, and fleeing angry bears—no problem for the wild child in Brenda that was there all along. [more]

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Myanmar: In My Father’s Footsteps: A Journey of Rebirth and Remembrance
by Pauline Hayton

Traumatized and physically depleted from aggressive cancer treatments, Pauline Hayton decides an adventure in Myanmar, formally known as Burma, will make her feel more alive. She takes along her husband Peter, and a film crew, students from Boston University, to capture her travels on film to help her grandchildren remember her should she develop further cancers and die, as expected, from the harsh radiation treatments. She explores remote regions where tourists rarely go and travels the famous Ledo road, visiting the places where, in WWII, her father participated in The Burma Campaign, as a Royal Engineer in Britain’s Fourteenth Army. Hayton’s jaunt in Myanmar turns into a journey of self-healing and remembrance of Fourteenth Army soldiers who suffered tremendous hardship as they fought to retake Burma from the Japanese. It is not in the spiritually charged atmosphere of the golden Shwe Dagon Pagoda or at the top of Mandalay Hill that Hayton starts her healing process, but on the shores of the great Ayeyarwady River as she recounts a twist of fate in Fourteenth Army’s 1945 river crossing while under fire from the Japanese. As dawn breaks, she finally faces her fear of crumbling to dust and disappearing from this world as have thousands of Bagan’s ancient pagodas. In Myitkyina, Hayton discovers a temple donated to the town some fifty years after the end of WWII by a Japanese Army captain, who fought under siege there and lost many comrades. Hayton realizes that she is not the only person to be carrying wounds from past traumatic events. Then, during a visit to Taukkyan War Cemetery, Hayton discovers her father’s friend’s name listed in the memorial book. He may have been part of “The Forgotten Army” but he is not forgotten here. Surrounded by row upon row of graves and the more than 27,000 names engraved on the Rangoon Memorial of Allied soldiers whose remains were never recovered from the jungle, a revelation hits her. Most of the graves belong to men who died in their twenties, and she has already lived more than thirty years longer than these young warriors. Gratitude for those extra years floods her whole being and the emotional pain from battling cancer and fearing an early death dissolves. [more]

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