Writers on the Air

Every Sunday WKDW 97.5 FM nonprofit radio invites writers of all levels to READ their poem, story, or screen play on its weekly program, “Writers on the Air.” (3 to 5 minutes is suggested). We’re looking for funny and family-friendly content.. We tape weekly on Sundays at 3:00 P.M. Sign-up is 2:30. The previous week’s taping is broadcast on the radio at 5:00 PM on Sundays.  Worldwide viewers can hear the show on the Internet.

Join us at Common Grounds Meeting Hall, 12735 US-41, North Port and relax in our family-friendly BYOB Listening Room, which offers snacks and comfortable seating. Find us next door to WKDW 97.5 FM radio station, which is south of Warm Mineral Springs if heading south from Venice. We are south of Caddy Carts. The public is WELCOME.

For more information, contact Linda Schell, Lschell2@verizon.net, 941-223-1262.
For cancellations, visit our FACEBOOK PAGE: Writers on the Air.
Location: Common Grounds Meeting Hall, 12737 S Tamiami Trail, North Port, FL 34287 

Hard to believe the collection of poems made it into a book, and that Amazon is offering it for sale at $14, free shipping if ordered by August 25th. The editing process, always ongoing, taught me just how much refocusing can happen when a publisher/editor asks simple questions about things you knew so well, before she asked.

Kelsay Books of Hemet, California published the book and sent it UPS to me, this July at Long Lake, NY. Two weeks went by as I tracked it cross-country to New Jersey, then to Glens Falls, NY where it got stacked in a warehouse, off the grid. Several calls, visits to the PO, cursing at the woods… Seems the destination address was insufficient. My luck changed when I spotted the Brown UPS delivery truck circling the village library. I hailed the driver, told him my anxiety-laden tale, and he handed me a 13.6 lb. box from California.

GCWA poets, Jim Gustafson and Joe Pacheco were instrumental in the editing process. Without the GCWA, I doubt I would have met either one of them. Karen Kelsay did a sensitive, efficient job at her end of the publishing process.

I encourage GCWA members to forge ahead with their work, to seek peer review and to learn how even the most modest publishing objectives can be accomplished.

I hope you buy The Time We Make in Passing and that you ask me to sign it for you. It will be an honor.

Gary McLouth

Hayton — Chasing Brenda

Chasing Brenda
by Pauline Hayton

Her sixtieth birthday, her self-centered husband, and the death of a friend have Brenda wondering what happened to her once adventurous spirit. Determined to get it back, she hotfoots it to a remote village in India. When family members give chase to persuade her to come home, life becomes hectic. Arriving in India, rebels promptly kidnap Brenda’s ditzy granddaughters. With the police no help and her dander up, Brenda turns into “Wonder Woman” on a mission, embarking on a hare-brained scheme to rescue “her girls.” Her showdown with the maniacal rebel leader has Brenda fearing for her life and the lives of her granddaughters. Calling him a moron doesn’t help. Against all odds, she outwits the rebels. Using implements hidden in her bra, Brenda escapes with the girls under cover of night. Traipsing through jungle, dodging rebels and bullets, and fleeing angry bears—no problem for the wild child in Brenda that was there all along. [more]

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Myanmar: In My Father’s Footsteps: A Journey of Rebirth and Remembrance
by Pauline Hayton

Traumatized and physically depleted from aggressive cancer treatments, Pauline Hayton decides an adventure in Myanmar, formally known as Burma, will make her feel more alive. She takes along her husband Peter, and a film crew, students from Boston University, to capture her travels on film to help her grandchildren remember her should she develop further cancers and die, as expected, from the harsh radiation treatments. She explores remote regions where tourists rarely go and travels the famous Ledo road, visiting the places where, in WWII, her father participated in The Burma Campaign, as a Royal Engineer in Britain’s Fourteenth Army. Hayton’s jaunt in Myanmar turns into a journey of self-healing and remembrance of Fourteenth Army soldiers who suffered tremendous hardship as they fought to retake Burma from the Japanese. It is not in the spiritually charged atmosphere of the golden Shwe Dagon Pagoda or at the top of Mandalay Hill that Hayton starts her healing process, but on the shores of the great Ayeyarwady River as she recounts a twist of fate in Fourteenth Army’s 1945 river crossing while under fire from the Japanese. As dawn breaks, she finally faces her fear of crumbling to dust and disappearing from this world as have thousands of Bagan’s ancient pagodas. In Myitkyina, Hayton discovers a temple donated to the town some fifty years after the end of WWII by a Japanese Army captain, who fought under siege there and lost many comrades. Hayton realizes that she is not the only person to be carrying wounds from past traumatic events. Then, during a visit to Taukkyan War Cemetery, Hayton discovers her father’s friend’s name listed in the memorial book. He may have been part of “The Forgotten Army” but he is not forgotten here. Surrounded by row upon row of graves and the more than 27,000 names engraved on the Rangoon Memorial of Allied soldiers whose remains were never recovered from the jungle, a revelation hits her. Most of the graves belong to men who died in their twenties, and she has already lived more than thirty years longer than these young warriors. Gratitude for those extra years floods her whole being and the emotional pain from battling cancer and fearing an early death dissolves. [more]

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